How WhatsApp got Bolsonaro elected president in Brazil

 Jair Bolsonaro’s campaign tactics sounded familiar to anyone who has been exposed to Donald Trump’s own election trail: he promised to return to “traditional values”, to rid the country’s political system of corruption and uplift the economy out of a long and suffered economic slump. He held rallies and televised ads, and his presence on the major social media platforms was evident. What is less known to the international crowd is how the messaging platform ‘WhatsApp’ might have helped the far right candidate spread falsehoods and embolden his political momentum.

Continue reading “How WhatsApp got Bolsonaro elected president in Brazil”

Race to One Trillion: Amazon’s Affairs in Washington

This is the second part of our analysis of Amazon’s rise to 1 trillion. Today, we look at the changing relations between Amazon and the US political circles.

When a company registers £178 billion revenue and employs 560,000 people, it does not go unseen in Washington’s, London’s or Brussels’ corridors of power. Amazon is no exception. The online retailer’s relation with politics is complex, being alternatively cooperative or detached, but is always functional to profit maximisation. Continue reading “Race to One Trillion: Amazon’s Affairs in Washington”

The ‘sharing economy’: Is it too good to be true?

Consumer trends are slowly shifting from ownership to experience. The rise of this ‘sharing economy’ has transformed market landscapes with the massive growth of companies like Uber and Airbnb. Now, it’s possible to rent out your ride, your apartment, your workspace, and even your luxury clothing. In this rapidly-changing setting, the focus has shifted to assessing its newly-born risks.

Continue reading “The ‘sharing economy’: Is it too good to be true?”

The Other Side of the Table: What do the EU27 want from Brexit?

In a lot of the ongoing Brexit talks, it seems to sometimes be forgotten that any good negotiation has at least two sides involved. Of course, it sometimes feels like there are two competing factions on the British side alone, as remainers and leavers continue to fight the past battles of the referendum. But what is often forgotten is that it’s not one single, homogeneous entity sitting on the other side of the table. For as much as the EU27 claim to speak with one voice, and remarkably often do, they are still made up of 27 individual nations, with their own aims for these negotiations. So, as the Article 50 clock continues to tick, it seems sensible to examine what these are. Continue reading “The Other Side of the Table: What do the EU27 want from Brexit?”

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