Gold is losing its sparkle, yet the economy cheers

With rising fears about the US-China trade war and an imminent global recession, investors sought safety in assets like precious metals and sovereign bonds to hedge the risk against unfavorable market conditions. Gold prices move inversely with inflation, and bonds are perceived to be a safer bet as the risk of default is lower than equities. In recent months, demand for gold has risen as global outlook looks increasingly pessimistic. That trend, perhaps comfortingly, started to falter last week.

Continue reading “Gold is losing its sparkle, yet the economy cheers”

Hong Kong Protests: Danger, Democracy, and Disillusionment in the Far East

On Sunday, 18th August,  1.7 million people gathered in Hong Kong’s second-largest pro-democracy march, defying a police ban and increasingly sinister warnings from the Chinese Central government. The demonstration, the latest in a series of protests which have gripped the island region, was initially sparked in June 2019 by a widely controversial extradition-bill which would empower local authorities to detain and extradite individuals to countries Hong Kong does not have formal agreements with, including Mainland China and Macau. Fears were ignited that these laws would undermine the autonomy of the region by placing Hong Kongers and visitors under mainland Chinese jurisdiction, where forced confessions and unfair trial procedures for political prisoners are common. Continue reading “Hong Kong Protests: Danger, Democracy, and Disillusionment in the Far East”

The Roar of the Asian Economy: If Asia is the economic engine of the future, who drives the car?

In a two-part series, the Warwick Economics Summit explores how changing consumption, trade and business patterns are set to reshape the global economy, and how the might of the Asian consumer is pulling the centre of economic gravity towards them.

In the second part of the series, we wonder if the political power will shift as well, most notably the tango of values between the United States and China. It might be the case that the economic engine of the world is the East, but the political driver may very well be the West. 

Continue reading “The Roar of the Asian Economy: If Asia is the economic engine of the future, who drives the car?”

The Roar of the Asian Economy: Consumption growth is set to make Asia the economic centre of the world

In a two-part series, the Warwick Economics Summit explores how Asia is set to transform the world over the course of the next decade. Primarily using research from McKinsey, we discuss how changing consumption, trade and business patterns are set to reshape the global economy, and how the might of the Asian consumer is pulling the centre of economic gravity towards them.

The economic centre of power is shifting, that much is accepted. But in the second part of the series, we wonder if the political power will shift as well, most notably the tango of values between the United States and China. It might be the case that the economic engine of the world is the East, but the political driver may very well be the West. 

Continue reading “The Roar of the Asian Economy: Consumption growth is set to make Asia the economic centre of the world”

WES Exclusive: Interview with Professor Chris Anderson on the Rise of Populism

In recent years, the rapid-emergence of parties associated with Populism on the Right and Left of the political spectrum has been a growing trend, represented by a number of shock election-outcomes in countries including Brazil, India, the Philippines, and the UK. WES has the chance to interview Prof. Chris Anderson, a Research Associate at the Centre of Comparative Advantage in the Global Economy and Director of the PPE program at the University of Warwick, about the underlying causes of Populism and his views on the future of reactionary outcomes.

We began the interview by discussing a recent research paper co-authored by Professor Anderson titled: ‘Crisis of Confidence? The Dynamics of Economic Opinions during the Great Recession”. In the paper, Prof. Anderson discussed how real economic variables and political structures of nations affected the perception of crises leading to different voting behaviour. In Prof. Anderson’s analysis of the extent of influence economic outcomes had on the recent surge towards populism, we asked this question: were the populist outcomes a direct consequence of the Global Recession or instead symptomatic of a permanent move away from established policy?

Continue reading “WES Exclusive: Interview with Professor Chris Anderson on the Rise of Populism”

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