WES Exclusive: PIIE on China’s model of governance and its growing influence 

NB: This article reflects the view of the writer, and does not reflect the stance of The Warwick Economics Summit

A democratically elected government, in recent times, have been synonymous with the image of good governance. The picture of smartly dressed MPs debating passionately on the UK’s green parliament bench, coupled with the relatively melodious “odd-deur” bellowing loudly from former speaker John Bercow’s deep vocals, has been etched on the minds of voters as the embodiment of free speech and democracy. 

Free speech, the belief that everyone’s voice and opinions deserve recognition, has been the cornerstone of Western democracy. It goes by unchallenged, lacking a credible ideological competitor, where many in the world accept it as an inherent good that is pursuable as an ends to itself. But its once unquestionable dominance as the most optimal model of governance is now being contested by China, whose meritocratic, yet very much autocratic, model of governance have paid out substantial dividends to the country in terms of economic growth and development. 

Continue reading “WES Exclusive: PIIE on China’s model of governance and its growing influence “

Why the US’s feud with Huawei transcends security concerns

Huawei, the telecommunications company that promises to revolutionise connectivity, faces a powerful adversary in the form of the US. Founded in 1987, Huawei has become the dominant player in its field, outcompeting its European 5G rivals. The technology company is also a significant player in the smartphone industry, beating Apple in overall sales, thus jumping to second place and in the process separating the two smartphone giants; Apple and Samsung, for the first time in seven years. Huawei’s tenure as the dominant 5G provider has not been a comfortable one.

Continue reading “Why the US’s feud with Huawei transcends security concerns”

The Roar of the Asian Economy: If Asia is the economic engine of the future, who drives the car?

In a two-part series, the Warwick Economics Summit explores how changing consumption, trade and business patterns are set to reshape the global economy, and how the might of the Asian consumer is pulling the centre of economic gravity towards them.

In the second part of the series, we wonder if the political power will shift as well, most notably the tango of values between the United States and China. It might be the case that the economic engine of the world is the East, but the political driver may very well be the West. 

Continue reading “The Roar of the Asian Economy: If Asia is the economic engine of the future, who drives the car?”

The Roar of the Asian Economy: Consumption growth is set to make Asia the economic centre of the world

In a two-part series, the Warwick Economics Summit explores how Asia is set to transform the world over the course of the next decade. Primarily using research from McKinsey, we discuss how changing consumption, trade and business patterns are set to reshape the global economy, and how the might of the Asian consumer is pulling the centre of economic gravity towards them.

The economic centre of power is shifting, that much is accepted. But in the second part of the series, we wonder if the political power will shift as well, most notably the tango of values between the United States and China. It might be the case that the economic engine of the world is the East, but the political driver may very well be the West. 

Continue reading “The Roar of the Asian Economy: Consumption growth is set to make Asia the economic centre of the world”

WES Exclusive: The Center for China and Globalisation on US Protectionism and China’s faltering growth

Donald Trump has triumphantly claimed his tariffs are the primary cause for China’s slowest GDP growth in three decades. Unconvinced, we asked the Center for China and Globalisation for their views.

China’s softening economy came at the back of a tumultuous trade war with Washington, where its exports suffered heavily due to tariffs from the US. In turn, this affected the GDP numbers for China which recorded a year-on-year growth of 6.2 percent, its lowest since records began. Impulsive as ever, President Trump immediately tweeted that China’s ailing GDP is a result of the effectiveness of the US’s tariffs.

But many are unconvinced the dip in China’s economic numbers can be largely credited to President Trump’s trade war. For that, the Warwick Economics Summit reached out to the Center for China and Globalisation (CCG), a leading Chinese non-governmental think-tank based in Beijing, for their thoughts on the factors that led to China’s faltering performance.

Continue reading “WES Exclusive: The Center for China and Globalisation on US Protectionism and China’s faltering growth”

WES Exclusive: Prof. Obstfeld on US-China Relations, Greece’s Economy and more

Wise people tend to measure words and carefully address every aspect of the topic they are discussing, avoiding oversimplification and rushed conclusions. Having served as the Chief Economist at the IMF and Chief Macroeconomist in Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors, Professor Maurice Obstfeld makes no exception to this principle. Continue reading “WES Exclusive: Prof. Obstfeld on US-China Relations, Greece’s Economy and more”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑