Women vs. Society

Woman. It is one simple word. A word that everyone knows. A word that describes roughly 50% of the world population. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a woman as:

The female human being; the female part of the human race, the female sex.

What one should note about the above definition is that none of it suggests that a woman is somehow lacking in certain qualities. It does not state that a woman is unfit to make political decisions. It does not say that being a woman means a person is not cut out to succeed in the corporate world. It does not state that the government is more suited to decide about a woman’s body than she is. Yet society seems to have trouble understanding that.

Although there is undeniable evidence of the immense amount of progress that has been made towards the emancipation of women, as 2015 marked the year when the last country that denied women the right to vote* – Saudi Arabia, finally passed a law that gives its entire adult population a voice in the election process, it is not all roses. Continue reading “Women vs. Society”

War and Peace – and Oil

2020 has started with a bang. Oil prices have had a turbulent week since the US launched an airstrike in Baghdad, killing Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. With escalating geopolitical tensions between the US and Iran, and factoring in the importance of the Middle East to global oil supply, it’s unsurprising that the price of the commodity jumped to as much as $70 a barrel on Monday 6 January for the first time in 4 months. Investors feared the airstrike that killed Iran’s top military commander might trigger retaliation and disrupt global energy supplies, inciting a crude oil stockpile.  Continue reading “War and Peace – and Oil”

Climate change is not a game… or is it?

“We deserve a safe future. And we demand a safe future. Is that really too much to ask?”. The words of the 16 year old climate change activist and The Times’ person of the year 2019, Greta Thunberg, ring true all the way into the new decade. And the answer seems straightforward: no, it is not too much to ask.

In the 1990’s scientists determined a definite link between humanity’s considerable greenhouse gas emissions and the disproportionate heating of the planet. Thus, this year marks three decades of awareness of the world-wide issue. However, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), rather than getting better, the problem is only getting worse. Continue reading “Climate change is not a game… or is it?”

The King is (Nearly) Dead: How can the Founding Fathers help us understand Impeachment?

 

On Wednesday, December 18th, the US House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump– making him only the third president in history to be formally charged with committing high crimes and misdemeanours and to face removal by the US Senate.

Mr Trump was sentenced to two articles of impeachment in total for violating his “constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States”. 

The first, abuse of power, centred on accusations that Mr Trump had overstepped executive authority by illegally soliciting electoral assistance from the Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Mr Trump had asked the foreign leader to launch investigations into Democratic Presidential front-runner Joe Biden’s son Hunter, who had previously served on the board of private Ukrainian natural gas company, Burisma. Mr Trump had pressured the Ukrainian government to complete this investigation by withholding valuable U.S. government actions including $391 million of military aid already approved by Congress.  The second article, Obstruction of Congress, surrounded Mr Trump directing his White House to defy lawful subpoenas throughout the Impeachment enquiry.

Continue reading “The King is (Nearly) Dead: How can the Founding Fathers help us understand Impeachment?”

Is Democracy Dying in the West?

Is Democracy Dying in the West?

These were no doubt the thoughts echoed by many on viewing the results of the House of Representatives vote on Impeachment against President Trump. Faced with repeated constitutional violations, the Republican party was largely silent. Although both bills were able to pass the House, (230 vs 197 and 229 to 198 respectively),  support was distinctly split down party lines- not a single member of the Republican party voted in favour of impeachment.

Continue reading “Is Democracy Dying in the West?”

WES Exclusive: PIIE on China’s model of governance and its growing influence 

NB: This article reflects the view of the writer, and does not reflect the stance of The Warwick Economics Summit

A democratically elected government, in recent times, have been synonymous with the image of good governance. The picture of smartly dressed MPs debating passionately on the UK’s green parliament bench, coupled with the relatively melodious “odd-deur” bellowing loudly from former speaker John Bercow’s deep vocals, has been etched on the minds of voters as the embodiment of free speech and democracy. 

Free speech, the belief that everyone’s voice and opinions deserve recognition, has been the cornerstone of Western democracy. It goes by unchallenged, lacking a credible ideological competitor, where many in the world accept it as an inherent good that is pursuable as an ends to itself. But its once unquestionable dominance as the most optimal model of governance is now being contested by China, whose meritocratic, yet very much autocratic, model of governance have paid out substantial dividends to the country in terms of economic growth and development. 

Continue reading “WES Exclusive: PIIE on China’s model of governance and its growing influence “

Mental health: A battle well fought, but the war remains

Mental health is a topic that has gained prominence in recent times, where a societal shift in perspective led to the issue being widely accepted by the public. Although, medicine and surgery are one of the most respected lines of work in the world, professionals that treat our minds, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist, have fared significantly less well than their counterparts. 

Before the Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud developed the idea of psychoanalysis (1890’s) and thus created a foundation for the field of psychology – taking a more scientific approach towards the mind – humanity was almost completely oblivious to the existence of mental illnesses and their variety. Even after Freud, however, it took the world a long time before it started treating mental health seriously.

Continue reading “Mental health: A battle well fought, but the war remains”

If you like it put a ring on it: LVMH buys Tiffany

In November, LVMH, a French luxury goods giant, announced it is buying American jeweler Tiffany & Co as part of a $16.2bn (£12.6bn) deal. The deal came after months of speculation and an earlier rejected offer at $120 per share. LVMH was able to tie the knot after raising its offer price to $135 per share – a shiny premium over Tiffany’s $90 share price in October.

In the classic 1961 film, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly muses that Tiffany’s is a place where “nothing very bad could happen to you”.  Can the same be said for LVMH after undertaking this acquisition?

Continue reading “If you like it put a ring on it: LVMH buys Tiffany”

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