America’s STEM Shortage I: Hardline immigration policy is challenging the future of international students

In the first of a 3 part series, WES investigates how hardline immigration policy is challenging the future of international students in the US and the potential consequences of this shift in policy on the nation’s long-term STEM innovation.

The United States’  ability to attract the best and brightest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)  fields from around the world has provided it with a  competitive edge for the past half-century, yet this edge is at risk. 

Recent administrations have frequently bemoaned an ongoing shortage of STEM graduates. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated there will be 1 million job openings in computer occupations alone. Last year, the Trump Administration directed the Department of Education to make promoting high-quality STEM education a top priority.

Continue reading “America’s STEM Shortage I: Hardline immigration policy is challenging the future of international students”

America’s STEM shortage III: How can Skilled Immigration Reform propel technological progress?

As the US makes it harder for universities to attract foreign students, other countries are working to enroll more of them; this could be detrimental to the nation’s long-term innovation, start-up investment, and output-capacity.  

Evidence that the US is losing its luster to competitors comes from comparative changes in international student numbers. Although the U.S. retains the most international students across undergraduate and graduate education as a gross total, within the period 2016-8 this figure grew by only 4.9% in this period, lagging  behind both Canada (which increased 39.5% in this period) and Australia (which increased by  25.5%)

Continue reading “America’s STEM shortage III: How can Skilled Immigration Reform propel technological progress?”

America’s STEM shortage II: Why high-skilled immigrants are vital for innovation

Mounting visa problems and other obstacles are making it harder for talented students and skilled workers to enter the US, depriving the nation of the brainpower required to succeed in a fast-moving world built upon collaborative technological progress. 

Challenging conventional wisdom

Critical to embracing immigration reform is challenging the conventional notion that skilled-immigration unfairly increases competition and depresses the earnings to American workers in STEM.

Continue reading “America’s STEM shortage II: Why high-skilled immigrants are vital for innovation”

An Addicted Nation: How can data-driven policies transform the U.S. opioid epidemic?

On the 26th of August, for its part in driving Oklahoma’s spiralling opioid-epidemic, Johnson & Johnson was ordered to pay $572 million in a court-ruling against the pharma-conglomerate. The case follows similar trials against several major pharmaceutical-firms accused of aggressively marketing opioids as low-risk solutions whilst undermining their high potential for addiction, including Teva Pharmaceuticals and OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma, which has offered up to $12 billion to settle more than 2, 000 lawsuits across 48 US states. Continue reading “An Addicted Nation: How can data-driven policies transform the U.S. opioid epidemic?”

Hong Kong Protests: Danger, Democracy, and Disillusionment in the Far East

On Sunday, 18th August,  1.7 million people gathered in Hong Kong’s second-largest pro-democracy march, defying a police ban and increasingly sinister warnings from the Chinese Central government. The demonstration, the latest in a series of protests which have gripped the island region, was initially sparked in June 2019 by a widely controversial extradition-bill which would empower local authorities to detain and extradite individuals to countries Hong Kong does not have formal agreements with, including Mainland China and Macau. Fears were ignited that these laws would undermine the autonomy of the region by placing Hong Kongers and visitors under mainland Chinese jurisdiction, where forced confessions and unfair trial procedures for political prisoners are common. Continue reading “Hong Kong Protests: Danger, Democracy, and Disillusionment in the Far East”

The Roar of the Asian Economy: If Asia is the economic engine of the future, who drives the car?

In a two-part series, the Warwick Economics Summit explores how changing consumption, trade and business patterns are set to reshape the global economy, and how the might of the Asian consumer is pulling the centre of economic gravity towards them.

In the second part of the series, we wonder if the political power will shift as well, most notably the tango of values between the United States and China. It might be the case that the economic engine of the world is the East, but the political driver may very well be the West. 

Continue reading “The Roar of the Asian Economy: If Asia is the economic engine of the future, who drives the car?”

The Roar of the Asian Economy: Consumption growth is set to make Asia the economic centre of the world

In a two-part series, the Warwick Economics Summit explores how Asia is set to transform the world over the course of the next decade. Primarily using research from McKinsey, we discuss how changing consumption, trade and business patterns are set to reshape the global economy, and how the might of the Asian consumer is pulling the centre of economic gravity towards them.

The economic centre of power is shifting, that much is accepted. But in the second part of the series, we wonder if the political power will shift as well, most notably the tango of values between the United States and China. It might be the case that the economic engine of the world is the East, but the political driver may very well be the West. 

Continue reading “The Roar of the Asian Economy: Consumption growth is set to make Asia the economic centre of the world”

Into the Heart of Darkness: Combating the DRC’s resurgent Ebola crisis

On the 17th of July, the World Health Organisation (WHO) announced that the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) had been classified a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), in a statement many considered long overdue. The declaration was intended to raise global awareness on the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history among world governments and to energise a coordinated international response to contain the spread of the highly fatal disease. The current DRC outbreak, which surfaced in August 2018, infected more than 2500 people in the DRC with 1650 confirmed deaths. The declaration highlights growing worldwide concerns about aid agencies’ inability to bring the Ebola virus under control whilst operating in conflict-ravaged regions of north-eastern DRC, 11 months after the initial outbreak.

Continue reading “Into the Heart of Darkness: Combating the DRC’s resurgent Ebola crisis”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑